COVID ANALYSIS

Best Practices

Wear a Mask
Maintain a 6 Foot Distance from Others
Wash Hands Often (for at least 20 seconds)

Develop a response to Coronavirus and additional safety measures to keep others informed before reopening. Display signs and posters illustrating hand-washing – ask your local public health authority for these or look at www.WHO.int.

Your response should be available in electronic form and downloadable document form based on data, projections, diagnostic/testing, and flattening the curve.

Be sure to follow in conjunction with the mandate and CDC recommendation of keeping a minimum of 6 feet between you and others. Make sure that the public is aware of any changes in your day-to-day operations or modified business hours.

Ensure the signs are displayed near the entrance for employees and customers in English, Spanish, and other languages. Also, use symbols for hearing impaired. Subject line “Our response to COVID-19” “an important update from your company” and state any

TIMELINE SARS-CoV-2 ON SURFACES

Environment’s role in cleaning and disinfecting October 2020: Continue to clean your facilities, residence, and monitor your hand hygiene moving forward. Studies and evidence suggests that colder temperatures are more likely and hospitable for SARS-CoV-2 on surfaces as compared to warmer months. Established a cleaning schedule for residence (i.e. homes) and are pay attention to the hand hygiene of the entire household.

Scientists are working to establish the length of time SARS-CoV-2 can remain infectious on surfaces to help people stop the spread of COVID-19 in their communities. Data collected from the NEJM, Lancet, and Virology Journal.

Timeline we're outlining how long the virus can be detected on surfaces in a laboratory setting.

The primary mode of transmission remains airborne droplets as well as aerosols, particularly in enclosed environments. Top health officials have established that surfaces most likely become contaminated when an infected individual dispels infectious droplets in the air around the object. The new coronavirus causes a respiratory illness, so it typically spreads via airborne droplets. When an infected person coughs or sneezes, droplets carrying viral particles can land on someone else’s nose or mouth or get inhaled. 239 scientists claim it is airborne.

In the Australian study, researchers discovered the 28-day viability period by placing virus particles into a "solution" that they spread across surface. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention have shared evidence indicating that low humidity and colder temperatures are more hospitable for the SARS-CoV-2 virus specifically, "whereas warmer temperature and higher humidity" impacted how long it remains infectious on most surfaces.

The pandemic research that's been conducted thus far has measured how long the virus can be detected on a surface, but not all studies determined how long the virus remains infectious, which is a key difference. Most experts maintain that the virus doesn't remain viable beyond 24 hours, especially as sunlight and humidity may inactivate virus particles faster. Ronn Eccles, Ph.D., the former director of the Common Cold Centre at Cardiff University.

Clean, or take the time to disinfect, the kitchen counter, fridges and sinks, dining tables, coffee tables, and things like doorknobs, handles, and latches on a set schedule.

Updated guidance cleaning and disinfecting:
Routine cleaning surfaces with soap or detergent, at least once per day, substantially reduce virus levels on surfaces. Disinfection is only recommended in indoor-setting schools and homes where there has been suspected or confirmed case of COVID-19, within the last 24 hours.

Clean and disinfect surfaces and things you touch often, such as tables, chairs, doorknobs, light switches, elevator buttons, handrails, countertops, remote controls, shared electronic equipment, shared exercise equipment, handles, desks, phones, keyboards, toilets, faucets, and sinks. For shared electronic equipment, guidance for cleaning and disinfecting of electrical equipment, follow the original equipment manufacturer (OEM) instructions for specific cleaning protocols for equipment or consult the OEM for guidance if such instructions are not available. (Updated 4/6/2021)

  • plastic

    Plastic:

    Research suggests that SARS-CoV-2 can be detected anywhere from 3 to 7 days, and the latest evidence stipulates that infectious virus may persist up until 28 days on non-porous plastic surfaces.

  • metal

    Metal:

    On copper, researchers established that viable virus wasn't detected on this particular metal after 4 hours. Other evidence suggests that stainless steel and metals can play host to the virus between 3 and 7 days.

  • papper

    Paper:

    While the Lancet study determined that SARS could be detected on paper money for up to 4 days after first exposure, money was one surface that successfully held onto the virus in the 28-day range in the Virology Journal findings. Reference: The Lancet also determined that virus particles couldn't be detected on printed paper or tissue paper after 3 hours.

  • glas

    Glass:

    Initial evidence suggested that virus could be detected on surfaces like windows or our screens on televisions, computers, or smartphones for up to 4 days.

  • cardboard

    Cardboard:

    Food packaging and shipping boxes were initially subject to debate at the onset of the pandemic, as people disinfected their shopping when they returned home. Reference: NEJM study suggests that viable virus couldn't be detected on cardboard after 24 hours, meaning you might be able to quarantine your shopping outside of the kitchen until then.

  • cloth

    Cloth or non-porous surfaces:

    Reference: CSIRO team's research found that common cotton didn't hold onto the virus beyond two weeks (most inactivated upon first contact).
    Some of the research differs on whether a surface remained infectious in a given time period, but at any rate, you should be actively cleaning and disinfecting high-touch surfaces inside your residence and homes guided by the timelines above. Washing your hands properly after returning home is most important, since you can easily bring germs inside your home after being outside and touching all kinds of surfaces.
    Research on SARS-CoV-2 on surfaces: If someone who doesn’t live in your residence has spent time in an space recently, or if someone in your home become ill, disinfect a surface, as it can help lower the risk of contracting COVID-19 through high-touch surfaces.
    For the most up-to-date information on COVID-19, please visit the online resources provided by the CDC, WHO, and your local public health department as more information about the coronavirus pandemic develops.

Promote good respiratory hygiene  in the workplace.

Promote good respiratory hygiene in the workplace.

Display posters promoting respiratory hygiene. Ensure that face masks (fabric) and/or paper tissues are available at your workplace for those who develop a runny nose or cough at work, along with closed bins for hygienically disposing of them.

Make sure your workplaces are clean  and hygienic, and supplies are available.

Make sure your workplaces are clean and hygienic, and supplies are available.

Surfaces (e.g., desks and tables) and objects (e.g., telephones, keyboards) need to be wiped with disinfectant regularly because contamination on surfaces touched by employees and customers is one of the main ways that COVID-19 spreads. Sharing your delivery and takeout options will put customers at ease and help keep revenue coming.

Updated guidance cleaning and disinfecting:
Routine cleaning surfaces with soap or detergent, at least once per day, substantially reduce virus levels on surfaces. Disinfection is only recommended in indoor-setting schools and homes where there has been suspected or confirmed case of COVID-19, within the last 24 hours. Previously, surfaces (e.g., desks and tables) and objects (e.g., telephones, keyboards) needed to be wiped with disinfectant regularly because contamination on surfaces are touched by employees and customers during COVID-19. The primary mode of transmission remains airborne droplets as well as aerosols.

Put sanitizing hand rub dispensers in prominent places around the workplace.

Put sanitizing hand rub dispensers in prominent places around the workplace.

Promote regular and thorough hand-washing by employees, contractors, and customers. Make sure these dispensers are regularly refilled.

Reassure your customers.

Reassure your customers.

Let your customers know about all of the precautions you’re taking to help reduce the virus spread. Please include any additional cleaning measures or staffing adjustments, and reassure them that you’re safe to do business with them.

4 WAYS YOUR COMPANY CAN HELP MANAGE:

  • 1 Washing hands and clean surfaces with disinfect solutions.
  • 2 High risk in countries where virus is spreading when people are close , check open spaces staff work in and involve teleworking if possible or different shifts.
  • 3 Meet virtually
  • 4 Your workers will be affected as school across the U.S. close. Please plan ahead whether transportation services, meal preparation, and activities. See EOP

MORE TIPS

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Stay connected with your
public health officials.

More people will be staying at home, so your social media channels provide a captive audience opportunity. Use public health officials websites and public health apps to keep up to date. Covid-19 is genetically related to the Corona virus responsible for the SARS outbreak of 2003. While related, they are different. For more information see public health officials and CDC for more information.

Combine this with other communication measures such as offering guidance from occupational health and safety officers, briefings at meetings, and information on the intranet to promote hand-washing.

Ensure that staff, contractors, and customers have access to places where they can wash their hands with soap and water because washing kills the virus on your hands and prevents the spread of COVID-19.

Brief employees, contractors, and customers that if COVID-19 starts spreading in the community, anyone with even a mild cough or low-grade fever needs to stay home.

Keep communicating and promoting the message that people need to stay at home even if they have just mild symptoms. Display posters with this message in your workplaces. Combine this with other communication channels commonly used in your organization or business.

Your occupational health services, local public health authority, or other partners may have developed campaign materials to promote this message.

Make clear to employees whether that they will be able to count this time off as sick leave.

New guidelines issued for workplaces, business travel. Here’s the latest Travel Advisories: https://travel.state.gov/content/travel/en/traveladvisories/traveladvisories.html

Implement any mitigation plans, including WHO.int, military assistance, FDA, mandates, and executive orders. Go to CDC.gov for COVID plans for your state for 12/2020 to 18 months forward with data and projections and flatten the curve.
https://covid19.healthdata.org/united-states-of-america

Review, update and implement emergency operations plans (EOP). This should be done in collaboration with local health departments, external and other relevant partners, community resources, DHS, military, US Army, and WHO.int.

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